Shinko fatty tire

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Admin, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. Admin

    Admin Administrator Staff Member
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    I've been reading about the goldentyre fatty front tire a lot lately and came across this video. Seems Shinko factory used to make the Fatty for Goldentyre before they moved production to China. They now offer what seems to be the same tire for half the cost.

    Some have said that the fat front tire is great at swallowing up trail trash in the technical trail, and others say it's too slow turning.

    I'm interested to hear from anyone who's tried it in rocky technical terrain. Especially on a Beta. Now, I know that the Beta comes with a somewhat rear weight bias and a taller front tire is probably less desirable, but I was considering running it with the Shinko 120 Cheater in the rear which is also pretty tall, so it may balance out and give the pegs a bit more clearance?

     
  2. Hurricane

    Hurricane B level Member

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    Very interested, subscribed.
     
  3. Admin

    Admin Administrator Staff Member
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    All of this talk made me buy a shinko 216mx fatty and a cheater 505 120. I tried them out tonight in tight technical sharp rocky single track and here is my impression fatty at 10psi, and cheater at 5psi, both Tubliss on 300rr

    I immediately noticed how slow turning the bike was, felt like I was on a big thumper! everything felt slow, but plush. I can't tell which tire or both are giving me the feeling. wheeling at obstacles took way more throttle and clutch than I'm used to and I actually had to ride a gear lower than usual. The 120 is just too big and heavy for my liking...going back to a trials tire in the rear. Anyone looking for a 120 cheater with 12 miles on it?

    The verdict is still out on the fatty front. It had a very "dead" feel to it, but it made any rock under 12" disappear and was very confidence inspiring charging into rock gardens . I don't know if the dead feel is actually the tire or tubliss...I've noticed other tires have less bounce/rebound when running tubliss compared to tubes at same psi. also the steering felt a bit "vague" but it may have been compounded by the huge rear 120. I was going to try 8 psi in the fatty, but opted to try my usual 10 psi, which is all I ever run in a tubed front tire. I actually feel like the fatty needed more psi even though I never run more than 10 in any other tire...don't know if more psi would negatively affect it or not.
     
  4. Hurricane

    Hurricane B level Member

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    Is the cheater only available in a 120? I have found that using a 120 instead of the stock 110 knobby gives my bike a slower turning feel. Curious to hear another review with your trials tire on the rear.
     
  5. Admin

    Admin Administrator Staff Member
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    I'll run the trials tire this weekend and report back. The cheater is also available in a 110, and it's a small 110, but the 120 is a very big 120. I tried the 120 in an effort to reduce the effect of the larger diameter front fatty, but it just made the bike too slow feeling for my liking.
     
  6. Hurricane

    Hurricane B level Member

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    Great keep us posted. I've been running a 110 IRC VE33 that I really like. It seems a little taller than the previous Dunlop 952 I had on the bike and work really good at lower air pressure. The tire feels pretty soft and always hooks up well in all conditions. I'm not a fan of trials tires on the rear because of the poor traction when braking.
     
  7. GMP

    GMP A level Member

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    Large rears do affect steering but not to the level of the fatty front, and not as much a factor in the rocky trail as smoother turns where you can put more demand on the front wheel. I've run many 120 size MT16s over the years that are big, but light, with noticeable but no dramatic effects. The 110 Cheater is a bit small, and requires more throttle control in loose stuff, but its lighter and more agile feeling, good compliance, better braking and cornering than a TT(not as good as traditional knobby), sticks almost as good as a TT, and works in rocks even when worn out. Sidewall holds up to 5 PSI Tubliss, and it cheap!
     
  8. Admin

    Admin Administrator Staff Member
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    I put my D803 back on the rear and went for a test ride yesterday. I also dropped the forks to the second line (was at the first) The bike handled much, much nicer. The steering is still a little different from what I'm used to but at least I was able to ride with some confidence yesterday. I feel like I can remove my steering damper when running the fatty front tire, in fact I tried that on the trail and liked it until the throttle cable got pinched between the top triple clamp and the stem....luckily I was on a steep downhill and not on the gas! $50 throttle cable was a bit high from Beta!
     
  9. Hurricane

    Hurricane B level Member

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    That's crazy that a tire can have that much of an effect to remove the damper. I'm assuming it was soaking up the deflection?
     
  10. GMP

    GMP A level Member

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    I might try the 90/90 size Shinko 216. The M59 is a very wide 80 size tire and I'm curious of the actual difference. I heard the 90/90 Shinko is the same width as the 100/90 too but also the tread and crown design is different so its really not the same tire. I mounted an 80/100 Shinko 216 on neighbors XTrainer and its a tiny 80/100, so the 90 may be about right. Cheap so worth a shot.

    Beta parts are stupid $$ sometimes. OEM is last resort but fortunately not much of that needed. Cable is the same as a KTM since forever. I run the Motion Pro with the retained ends, like $37 from RM I think. Heavier wire but they still show shiny wear spots after a year and the last one had a broken strand which could be a disaster.

    Do you have a cable guide on the damper post?
     
  11. Admin

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    I use a zip tie with a short piece of rubber hose to space the cable and keep it outside the stem, but without the damper arm attached to the stem the cable found it's way between the stem and top triple clamp in short order...oh well, live and learn!

    very much so! and that was at 10 psi tubliss
     
  12. Hurricane

    Hurricane B level Member

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    Interesting a tire vs a damper is big cost savings!
     
  13. Admin

    Admin Administrator Staff Member
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    I'm not saying that I would go without the damper, but on a short test it felt fine without. I would need a real test in different environments to actually make a bold statement like that!
     
  14. Hurricane

    Hurricane B level Member

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    I've rode with them and without them on multiple bikes and quite frankly never felt there were worth the price of admission. I think if your suspension is properly set up then a damper just doesn't do much, for me anyway. Currently I'm not running a damper on ktm and I doubt I do.
     
  15. GMP

    GMP A level Member

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    I agree to a point, shouldn't have to have a damper to mask suspension issues. But, its the occasional thing that always happens in off road, like clipping a rock on edge you didn't see, or just barely clipping a tree. The movement of the bars is slowed down enough for you to react and save your ass. I always have the low speed turned all the way down so its barely noticeable, but the high speed is sensitive (on a Scotts). Over the years I have bent and broken three towers and a bunch of drive pins from the force. It works.
     
  16. Hurricane

    Hurricane B level Member

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    Yeah I agree with that which is the actual purpose of them. I've used both Scott's and GPR and couldn't tell much difference between them and we ride a lot of rocks here in Missouri. My bike has actually benefited more from Fasstco Flexx Bars which really knock down the impact of trail junk you don't see. I never thought I would spend $300+ on a set of bars but I had to after getting a plate bolted to my collarbone! Sorry to go off topic here.
     
  17. GMP

    GMP A level Member

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    I also run Flexxbars and a plated collarbone! Stiff elastomers though, just to take the edge off don't like to feel them move. The GPR damper has no high speed ckt, only the Scotts and Fastway.

    A guy on TT is going to measure a 90/90 Shinko 216 so we will see how it compares to an M59.
     
  18. Dave.Smtih

    Dave.Smtih Super Moderator

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    I guess you folks are talking about throttle cable routing behind the triple clamp? (like KTM does or used to do)
    That is something I never cared for and replaced the cable with a Honda CR 125/250/500 item and routed it like the Japanese bikes.
     
  19. Dave.Smtih

    Dave.Smtih Super Moderator

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    Ditto (except for the broken shear pins)
     
  20. Admin

    Admin Administrator Staff Member
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    I picked up Graham Jarvis at the airport last night and we were discussing tires and said he really likes the GT Fatty front tire for the additional cushion, and that's coming from a Pro rider, on Factory Unobtainium Cone Valve forks!

    I'll be with him all weekend, so if you guys have any questions for him post them here! Hopefully we have internet service where we will be training.
     
    mtdirtbag likes this.

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